Event Log 2021-22

Join us this Thursday (11/18) from 7 to 9 pm to watch Pontypool (2008)! We will be discussing the linguistics (e.g., semantics, psycholinguistics) embedded in this unique language-based “zombie” movie as well! Join us on Zoom!

Join us this Wednesday (11/17) from 3:30-5 pm communitea! Join us on Zoom!

Join us this Wednesday (11/3) from 5-7 pm to get some help studying for the upcoming midterm in LIN232! Join us either in-person in Sidney Smith on Zoom!

Join us this Friday for movie night! We will be watching Pontypool! Dressing up is encouraged!!

Are you an undergraduate student interesting in applying to graduate school and applying for SSHRC/OGS fellowships? Join the Graduate Studies at the Department of Linguistics next Friday from 2-3 pm to find out about graduate school. This meeting will be happening via Zoom.

Join us this Monday at 5 pm for our first academic seminar of the year! Guest speaker Alexei Kochetov will be joining us to speak about Kalasha laterals: Phonetic realization and change-in-progress. For the full abstract of this seminar, see below!

Kalasha is an Indo-Aryan language spoken by a few thousand speakers in a remote mountainous region of Pakistan. In contrast to most related and areally adjacent languages, which have a single lateral approximant phoneme (/l/), Kalasha has two laterals, orthographically represented as <l> and <l’> (e.g. ala ‘uphill’ vs. al’a ‘him/her/it’). Historical sources of these sounds and their precise phonetic characterization remain poorly understood. Previous (often impressionistic) descriptions of the language have provided conflicting descriptions of the contrast – as either involving retroflexion or secondary articulations (palatalization or verlarization, or both). Some researchers have also noted considerable variation in the realization of the consonants and some difficulty distinguishing the sounds auditorily (by non-native speakers). In this talk I present results of an acoustic analysis of Kalasha laterals that help elucidate the phonetic nature of the contrast. Results of formant measurements of lateral closures, based on speech of 14 speakers recorded in Pakistan and Greece, confirm that the consonants are distinguished by secondary articulations, rather than retroflexion. However, the speakers markedly differ in how they realize the contrast – older speakers make use of palatalization to mark the distinction (/lʲ/ vs. /l/), while younger speakers combine palatalization with velarization, thus phonetically enhancing the contrast (/lʲ/ vs. /ɫ/). These results are indicative of a change in progress, which was presumably triggered language-internally – as an enhancement of an auditorily weak contrast. This change appears to have been further facilitated by language contact with Khowar (a sociolinguistically dominant language of the area), which has a velarized lateral.

Join us this Thursday (10/14) from 2-3:30 pm for our second communitea! This event will be held both virtually on Zoom AND in-person outside of Sidney Smith Commons!! For those joining us virtually, use this Zoom link. For those joining us in-person, meet us outside the front of Sidney Smith Commons! There will be snacks for those with us in-person!

Join us this Wednesday (10/13) from 5-7 pm to get some help studying for the upcoming midterm in LIN228! Use this Zoom link to join!

Join SLUGS on Tuesday (Oct 5) for our Fall General Meeting! This is the place to find out whats coming up this semester and to share any suggestions you may have for us or the department!

Join us this Wednesday from 4-5:30 pm for our first communiTEA of the year! Come hang out, get to know some of the community, and ask any questions you might have about linguistic courses, programs, or research opportunities!